An introduction to the components of executive branches in the united states government

Written inthe U. Constitution is both the oldest and shortest written constitution in the world. It serves as the supreme law of the United States.

An introduction to the components of executive branches in the united states government

Introduction[ edit ] The United States Constitution divides government into three separate and distinct branches: The concept of separate branches with distinct powers is known as "separation of powers.

The Englishman John Locke first pioneered the idea, but he only suggested a separation between the executive and legislative. Each branch is theoretically equal to each of the others.

The branches check each others powers and use a system known as checks and balances. Thus, no branch can gain too much power and influence, thus reducing the opportunity for tyrannical government. The Preamble to the American Constitution sets out these aims in the general statement: Its main function is to make laws.

It also oversees the execution of these laws, and checks various executive and judicial powers. The Congress is bicameral - it is composed of two houses. One house is the House of Representatives and the other is the Senate. The House of Representatives is currently composed of four hundred and thirty-five members.

Each of the fifty states is allocated one or more representatives based on its population which is calculated on a decennial basis once in ten years. Each state is guaranteed at least one representative.

A state that is allocated more than one representative divides itself, as state procedures dictate, into a number of districts equal to the number of representatives to which it is entitled. The people of each district vote to elect one representative to Congress States that have only one representative allocated choose at-large representatives - the state votes as one entire district.

The District of Columbia and a number of U. These delegates may participate in debates, and sit and vote in committee, but are not allowed to vote in the full House. Every House member faces re-election in an even-numbered year and is elected to a two-year term. The House is presided over by a Speaker, who is directly elected by the members of the House.

The Senate is the upper house of the legislative branch of the United States and possesses one hundred members which is considerably less than the four hundred and thirty-five members of the House of Representatives. Each state chooses two senators, regardless of that state's population.

The Constitution originally dictated that a state's senators were to be chosen by the state's legislature; after the Seventeenth Amendment was ratified insenators were elected directly by the state's population.

In contrast to the House's two-year terms, Senators are elected to a six-year stint in office. In addition, only one-third of the Senate stands for election during an even year. These differences between the two houses were deliberately put into place by the Founding Fathers; the Senate was intended to be a more stable, austere body, whereas the House would be more responsive to the people's will.

The Senate also chooses a President Pro Tempore to preside in the Vice-President's absence though, in practice, most of the time, senators from the majority take turns presiding for short periods.The power of the Executive Branch is vested in the President of the United States, who also acts as head of state and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces.

The President is responsible for. Established by Article I of the Constitution, the Legislative Branch consists of the House of Representatives and the Senate, which together form .

A summary of Components of American Government in 's Introduction to American Government. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Introduction to American Government and what it means.

Components of American Government. the United States has only two powerful political parties: the . An Introduction for Judges and Judicial IN THE UNITED STATES Judicial Services Office Department of Program Services Administrative Office of the United States Courts relationship to the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, and.

A summary of Components of American Government in 's Introduction to American Government. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Introduction to American Government and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. The United States is a constitutional .

An introduction to the components of executive branches in the united states government

The executive branch of the federal government ensures that the laws of the United States are obeyed. In carrying out this duty, the President of the United States is assisted by the Vice President, department heads – called Cabinet Secretaries – and the heads of the several independent agencies.

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